computer keys
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Although we live in a digital world, gaining the proper skills to become computer literate can be incredibly challenging.
Byte Back, located in Northeast, DC, seeks to bridge this digital divide by providing hands-on computer training to those in the community who lack access to digital communications or have little computer literacy.

Success is not uncommon at Byte Back. DC native Cheryl Williams landed her first paying job in over nine years after one month of attendance at the Benning Road Office Track Class. In 2010, half of unemployed students who enrolled in the program obtained employment and 15% of students who already had a job received a raise because of their training.

“We want to help unemployed and underemployed people compete in a highly competitive marketplace where computer literacy is vital,” says Byte Back communications associate Jessica Bates.

Courses are taught at over a dozen locations throughout the D.C. metro area. Students are offered more than six different programs to enroll in based upon their individual skill level, from basic Computer Literacy Training to Linux Certification.

“Our program doesn’t only work with people looking for employment possibilities; we also encourage retirees looking to learn basic computer skills to enroll in our senior course,” says Bates.

Byte Back also offers classes on American Sign Language, Spanish and computer courses for people with low-literacy.

Anyone with basic computer literacy can volunteer to teach beginner courses. For information on how to enroll, call 202-529-3395 or visit www.byteback.org. For information on volunteering, contact Eleanor Grewal at 202-529-3395.